Tiritiri Matangi

Hihi Site

Random entry RSS

  • OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    Posted in:

    Post-release effects in reintroduced populations

    Using Bayesian mark-recapture modelling to quantify the strength and duration of post-release effects in reintroduced populations. Published in: Biological Conservation Authors: Doug Armstrong (1), Christie Le Coeur (2), Joanne M. Thorne (1), Julia Panfylova (1), Tim G. Lovegrove (3), Peter G.H. Frost (4) and John G. Ewen (5) (1) Wildlife Ecology Group, Massey University, PB 11222, Palmerston North, New Zealand (2) Centre […]

    Read more

  • Environmental-DNA-cover

    Posted in:

    Post-release effects in reintroduced populations

    Published in: Biological Conservation Authors: Doug Armstrong (1), Christie Le Coeur (2), Joanne M. Thorne (1), Julia Panfylova (1), Tim G. Lovegrove (3), Peter G.H. Frost (4) and John G. Ewen (5) (1) Wildlife Ecology Group, Massey University, PB 11222, Palmerston North, New Zealand (2) Centre d’Ecologie et des Sciences de la Conservation, Sorbonne Universités, MNHN, CNRS, UPMC, Paris, France (3) Auckland […]

    Read more

  • IMG_0840 copy

    Posted in:

    Translocating people along with hihi

    The highlight of this season for hihi conservation has been establishing a seventh population, hihi have once again been returned to the mainland; this time to Taranaki. After spending the breeding season on Tiritiri Matangi it seemed like an obvious progression for me to move to Taranaki with the birds. To quote John, I have […]

    Read more

  • ecohealthcover9_1

    Posted in:

    A Comparison of Disease Risk Analysis Tools for Conservation Translocations

    Published in: Ecohealth Authors: Antonia Eleanor Dalziel (1,2), Anthony W. Sainsbury (1), Kate McInnes (3), Richard Jakob-Hoff (4), and John G. Ewen (1) (1) Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, London UK (2) Royal Veterinary College, London, UK (3) Department of Conservation, Conservation House – Whare Kaupapa Atawhai, Wellington, New Zealand (4) New Zealand Centre for Conservation Medicine, Auckland, New Zealand Abstract: Conservation translocations are increasingly used […]

    Read more

  • f1-medium

    Posted in:

    Do mothers bias offspring sex ratios in carotenoid-rich environments?

    Published in: Behavioral Ecology Authors: Kirsty J. MacLeod1, Patricia Brekke2, Wenfei Tong1,3, John G. Ewen2 and Rose Thorogood1 1. Behavioural Ecology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street CB2 3EJ, Cambridge, UK, 2. Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent’s Park, London NW1 4RY, UK and 3. Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT 59812 USA Abstract: If environmental or maternal factors favor […]

    Read more

  • 19d

    Posted in:

    Hanging with hihi: radio interview with GraemeHill RadioLIVE NZ

    Radio interview with Graeme Hill available from Radio Live New Zealand at:   http://www.radiolive.co.nz/Environews—Hihi-Stitchbirds/tabid/506/articleID/118152/Default.aspx   John Ewen from the Zoological Society of London is interviewed by Graeme about his work on hihi and hihi conservation.   In this interview John and Graeme chat about the challenges facing hihi, some of their colourful behaviours and their […]

    Read more

  • 50_4 thumbnail

    Posted in:

    Saving the hihi under climate change: a case for assisted colonization

    Published in: Journal of Applied Ecology Date published: December 2013 Authors: Aliénor Chauvenet (1,2), John Ewen (1), Doug Armstrong (3), and Nathalie Pettorelli (1) 1) Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent’s Park, London NW1 4RY, UK 2) Division of Biology, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire SL5 7PY, UK 3) Wildlife […]

    Read more

  • Male HIHI Bird

    Posted in:

    Vagrant bachelors could save rare bird

    A study conducted between research partners at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) in the United Kingdom and the University of Auckland in New Zealand has revealed the importance of single males in small, threatened populations. Results from a study of endangered New Zealand hihi (Notiomystis cincta), were recently published in the research journal Evolutionary […]

    Read more